How to Permanently Restore a Mattress Pad

Mattress pads wear out fast, don’t they?

The top is usually in good shape because they are quilted and made fairly well.

But, usually, the sides of the mattress pad are either made of a paper-like material or a thin nylon type that gets holes in it easily. I’ve fought both types for years. And it doesn’t matter how much you pay, they are never made to last.

You can see by the zig zag stitches I stitched on this paper-like material, that I had tried to mend it before.

But, it didn’t last long in the washing machine.

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In some areas, the elastic had torn away from the rest of the material:

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Recently, I decided it was time for a new solution, a more permanent solution….I needed to put new sides on.

This is easier than it sounds.

You will need some cotton fabric and some elastic. The amount you need of both will depend on the size of your mattress pad top. I’ll show you how to calculate what you need. The mattress pad I am revamping is a queen size.

First, measure the width, the length, and the depth (or height) of the mattress pad and write down the measurements on a piece of paper.

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Once you have done that, you will add seam allowances to each of the measurements.

As you can see below, I drew what each of the pieces would look like if they were separate and lying flat on the table. This is to help you see what shapes you’ll need to cut from the cotton fabric.

I added two inches overall to the width, two inches overall to the length because I want 1/2″ seam allowances.

I added three inches to the height because some of the pad extends underneath the mattress and the extra inch will make it hug the mattress nice and snug.

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I found some scrap muslin fabric that I had in my cupboard and cut the pieces out according to my measurements.

You don’t need muslin fabric. Any cotton or cotton/polyester blend should do.

After you’ve cut those pieces, set those pieces aside for now.

Next, trim away all the side material from the top of the mattress pad, cutting as close as possible without harming the top. If you don’t cut real close, it’s not a problem.

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Once you have the top piece cut away from the bottom piece, you are going to save the top piece.

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Next, you will stitch together the rectangles of fabric to form the sides of the mattress pad.

Stitch the vertical seams making sure you have the two short ends opposing each other and the two long pieces opposing each other. Also, make sure you are stitching all the pieces right sides together. You don’t want to twist them and have to rip some of the seams out later.

Here is what one seam looks like from the right side. I haven’t pressed the fabric yet, but it would be a good idea.

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Once I stitched the seams, I serged the edges to finish them off nicely. If you don’t have a serger, you could zig zag the edges together. This will keep your seams from raveling over time.

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Once the seams are serged, you should have a giant tube of fabric. Go ahead and serge to top edge of the tube all the way around.

Now, let’s talk about the elastic. The company used elastic “thread”. To duplicate this on your mattress pad would require alot of time and work. We are going to make a simple casing and add one piece of elastic.

I like a method that is fast. Most people would tell you to make the casing and then feed the elastic through the casing with a bodkin or a safety pin attached to the end of the elastic. That takes a very long time. I’m going to show you how to streamline and do two steps at one time.

To make the casing, fold up and press the bottom edge twice. I like to use 1/2″ wide elastic. So, to make my casing, I folded up the bottom edge 1/4″ and then 3/4″ . The 1/4″ hides the raw edge and the 3/4″ gives you enough room to stitch the elastic in without actually stitching on the elastic itself. We want that elastic to be able to stretch inside the casing as we sew the casing down.

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The cotton tube I sewed for the sides of the mattress pad has a perimeter of about 280″ (80″ + 80″ + 61″ + 61″=282″)

Let’s use the number 280″ for easy math.

Divide 280″ in half and you have 140″ or about 4 yards.

You’ll need to cut a piece of elastic about 4 yards long.

If you don’t have that much on hand, you can certainly use less. It’s not rocket science and you don’t have to be precise on this. You just don’t want your mattress pad to creep up or come off while you’re sleeping.

Turn the elastic into a tube and stitch the ends together as shown below. I overlap the ends and sew two rows of stitching to make it stronger.

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Next, I divide the elastic tube equally into fourths and put a pin in each of the four spots:

Then, I divide the cotton tube into fourths and put a pin in each of those four spots.

 

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Next, I just match up these pins.

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Then, I tuck the elastic into the folded edge and put one pin in that spot to anchor the elastic until I can sew it in.

Remember, I am not going to stitch on the elastic itself, just the casing, but the elastic will be tucked down in there.

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Next, I stitch the casing down, making sure the elastic is inside the folded area:

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You will have to move the elastic inside the casing when it gets too bunched up as you sew. Just keep pushing the elastic back as you sew.

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Don’t sew over any pins.

When you get to a spot where there is a pin, take the pin out and stitch across the casing to hold the elastic in place. There will be four spots where you stitch across the casing on the tube, by the time you are finished.

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Here is another angle of what that will look like:

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This is what the elastic edge will look like when you are finished sewing in the elastic:

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Now, it’s time to attach the tube to the mattress pad:

Start by dividing the mattress pad into fourths, just like you did with the tube.

Then, divide the tube (the non elastic side of the tube) into fourths.

Once you match up the pins from the mattress pad and the pins from the tube, pin those in place in the four spots.

***The seams on the tube should line up with the corners or curved edges of the mattress pad. This will keep your mattress pad and the sides fitting together nicely.

Now, pin all the way around the mattress pad. It should be a good fit.

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If it’s not exactly right, you can ease in the extra as you sew the two pieces together, but if you did your math correctly, it should be just right.

If there is a large difference, you may have to take in the seams on the corners of the tube before you sew the two pieces together.

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Stitch all the way around the mattress pad.

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Can you see how the two are attached? The seam runs basically vertically through the photo below:

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Here is the mattress before I put the updated mattress pad on:

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Here is the new mattress pad:

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Because the new mattress pad has durable cotton sides now, it should last for many years to come!

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How To Add Lining and Hem Your Drapes or Curtains

Finding drapes in the color, length and fabric you need is not an easy task, unless you get them custom made. But that is expensive.

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I found a set of drapes in the color and style I wanted, but the length was too long. Also, when I stood on the curb outside, they didn’t look good because the window in the bedroom next to this one had white lined drapes. Maybe you aren’t concerned with that type of thing, but it stuck out like a sore thumb to me.

Back inside the house, I decided to hem them and line them in white to match the other window, Because it’s the guest room, I thought it might be nice to line them with “block out” or “black out” fabric so that whoever is sleeping there, wouldn’t be blinded by the early morning sun.

You can use most any type of fabric for lining. JoAnn’s sells a brand called Roc Lon. It is Dry Clean only. So, if you can wash your drapes, choose a lining fabric that is washable. Cottons are the most common. Check with your local fabric store for ideas.

I found some decent block out fabric by the yard and on the roll at Joann Fabrics. I chose it partly because it was a little wider than the width of each drapery panel, which would mean I could figure out the yardage easily. I only needed to measure the length of the drape panels, add those measurements together and add enough for hems (at the top of the drapes and on the bottom).

My drapery rods were hung at a strange height by the previous owners. They were hung at 90″ above the ground and store bought drapes are 84″ and 95″ in length, so I either had to move the rods or buy longer panels and shorten them. On this window, I decided to shorten the drapes. I didn’t want to rehang rods, patch holes and paint.

Let’s start with the hem and proceed to the lining after that.

My drapes have metal grommets. Other drapes have pleats or gathers.

First, I measured from the top of the grommet hole to the hem. If your drapes have gathers, measure from the top of the casing opening where your rod fits in. If your drapes have pleats, measure from where the hook goes into the hole along the rod.

Don’t measure from the top of the drape!

Do you see why?

The drape hangs from the rod, so the top of the drape doesn’t matter in this case. Measure from where the drape hangs from the rod.

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To begin, I took out the original hem with a seam ripper.

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Then, I folded and pinned up the hem at the length I needed.

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The original hem was 3 inches and had another 1/2″ turned over to hide the raw edge.

So, I measured up 3 1/2″ from the hem edge and cut the excess off.

Be careful not to cut the drape underneath!

Since you are smarter than me, you will probably choose to unfold the hem and cut it so there’s no chance of accidentally cutting the drape, but I guess I like to live on the wild side. Ha!

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Press that folded edge. That will be your new hemline.

Remove the pins as you press, of course!

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Next, fold down 1/2″ from the cut edge and press it. This may seem a little backwards, but I like to make sure my hemline is straight. If the cut edge isn’t straight, the hemline won’t be either. Does that make sense?

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Now, just turn up your hem on the fold line and topstitch along the edge of that fold on the back of the drape, using the folded edge as your guide. You can topstitch from the front of the drape, if you can see the folded edge as you sew. I usually stitch from the front, but stitching from the backside of the drape makes it easier for you to see in the photo below.

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Ok, now you are ready to add the lining.

On a flat surface, lay out your lining fabric.

This is my “block out” lining fabric.

Cut the lining fabric at least 2 inches larger all the way around than the finished size of your drape. If you can make it larger, that’s fine. This drape was 54″ wide and my blockout fabric was 60″, so it was 3″ wider on each side of the drape, which was perfect!

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Once you cut it out, lay the top edge of the lining to the top edge of the drape like this photo below:

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It looks like its upside down, but this is what you want. You are going to be sewing at that fold just under the grommets all across the width of the drape. So, lay the right side of the lining to the wrong side of the drape and it’s upside down! Study the photo above until it makes sense to you.

Keep reading and I think you’ll see how it works.

In the photo below, can you see how there is a fold (bump) to the left of the presser foot? I am stitching barely to the right of that fold (bump). You can see the wrong side of the drape off to the right in the photo:

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Once you stitch across the width of the drape, along that fold or bump, pull the lining down to cover the entire wrong side of the drape (in the photo below) and the raw edge will be hidden under the fold. You don’t have to finish the raw edge of the block out fabric because it doesn’t ravel.

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Now, you’re going to work on the hem of the lining.

As long as your lining covers the folded hemline that you topstitched earlier and as long as the lining hem is not longer than the drape, you are good. Any length in between those areas is fine. Unless your drapes are see through. Then, I would have your lining end just under the topstitched line on the drape.

Here I folded up the lining so that it was 1″ above the bottom edge of the drape:

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Pin only the lining fabric. You don’t want to set an iron on block out fabric because it will melt. It is a man made material.

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I added a half inch to the length of my lining fabric and cut the excess off.

Now my lining is 1 1/2″ above the bottom edge of the drape:

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Next, I stitched along the folded edge of the hem of the lining fabric:

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Next, measure the “side” hems of the drapes. They run along the vertical edges of the drapes. In this case, they are about one inch:

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So, I folded under the sides so that they were 1 ” from the edge of the sides and pinned it all the way down (just like I did for the hem of the lining at the bottom):

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This time, I pinned the lining to the drape along the sides:

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Next, I stitched along the edge of the lining. If you have light colored drapes and the stitching is going to show, then stitch from the right side of the drape and use the original stitching line as your guide. Stitch right over the top of it being as exact as you can be. With my drapes, it didn’t show at all.

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This is what the inside should look like, except that the bottom edge of the lining will have already been stitched:

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Here’s the length before I started:

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Here’s the length after:

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I know there are other ways to line and hem drapes, but this one works the fastest for me.

Enjoy your project!