Granddaughter Update

Thank you all for your prayers and sweet comments concerning our new granddaughter. I really appreciate them all. She is doing better and gaining weight, now just over 6 pounds! Thought you might like to see a recent photo. I sure am enjoying her! 

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It’s Official…I’m A Grandma!!!

Just wanted to stop by and let you know that our precious little granddaughter has been born! She came a month early and weighed 3 pounds, 10 ounces. She and her mama are doing well. She was born a little over a week ago and will be in the NICU until she can feed with consistency. Otherwise, she’s perfect! Her mama and daddy can’t wait to get her home! Please keep them all in your prayers as they learn all things premie and mama recovers. Thank you!

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Readers…..Chime in!

Hi everyone,

I got a question from a reader yesterday that I thought would be great for you all to chime in and help answer.

I think we’ve all had to fix this problem at one time or another.

Here is her email:

Hi Linda,
Thank you for your blog!
I am working on my daughter’s bridal gown and will soon begin on the bridesmaid dresses.  My question deals with the invisible zippers in the dresses.  The bridesmaid dresses are strapless with simple a-line skirts in the back.  There are three layers: chiffon, charmeuse, and lining.  I have always struggled with getting a completely smooth transition to the seam at the bottom of the zipper, often getting a little bump.  Since these navy colored dresses have nothing to help hide an imperfect installation I would appreciate any tips to achieve a flawless look.
Thank you for any advice!
Have a great day,
Nancy

Thank You!

The WordPress annual report just showed up in my inbox.

I am speechless.

There were over 290,000 visits to this blog in 2013!

That’s about 800 per day….incredible!

And you are reading this blog from 179 countries all over the world…

(from some countries I have never heard of)…..even more incredible!

Thank you to each and every one of you for making my “job” so much fun!

Sewfordough will be five years old this coming April.

If you’d like to know how this all started, read this post.

And if you’d like to know how I learned to sew, read here.

It is inspiring to see which posts you look at each day.

And I love getting your emails, questions and comments.

Keep them coming!

Oh, and before I close out the year, I just want to let you all know that my husband and I are going to be grandparents, for the first time, this coming June!

We’re so excited!!!

So, any tips you have on sewing for grandkids or how to be a good grandma, will be totally appreciated!!!

I hope you and your family have a very blessed New Year filled with God’s richest blessings!

Quick Gift Idea

I went to my quilt group the other day and one of the ladies had an impromptu craft to share with us.

Those of you (and I’m not one of you!) who are handy with paper crafts can figure this out by looking at it.

It’s a star ornament filled with 6 Hershey kisses.

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It’s cute, isn’t it?

Here’s another angle:

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I don’t know where she got the pattern.

I might be able to explain how to make this to you:

We started by making the exterior of the star. You just fold into 5 (?) parts and have a flap that is glued to hold it together.

Then, we took a long narrow piece of good qualtity turquoise paper.

You fold it into 4 equal sections. There are two of these and they fit inside the big star. These hold the kisses.

Then, you can see the triangles that fit above and below the kisses.

We glued those to the top and bottom of the star.

(She had this great glue that dries in a flash.)

It was a little white bottle with green letters.

I know, I am a big help, aren’t I?!!

Then, she embossed the turquoise strip that goes around the star and we glued that on with this machine:

Then, there is a scalloped shape “roof” to the star.

Now, it’s time to add your kisses in the compartments.

Next, we punched a hole through this very thick ornament with an incredible gadget she had called a Crop-A Dile.

Crop-A-Dile

(Oh, my goodness, I may need one of these!

I don’t know why, because I don’t do paper crafts, but it just looks like it does alot of cool stuff!)

Next, we tied the silver cord through the hole to hang it on the tree.

Then, she gave us the silver medallions to glue on the center of the star.

The only thing that she didn’t have was a round rhinestone to glue in the middle of the medallion.

For those of you who know how to do this type of thing and have all the great gizmos to do it, it doesn’t take any time at all.

And it sure looks elegant!

Should You Charge A Minimum Fee For Alterations?

I get asked this question alot.

So, let’s take an example.

This morning, I found a bag on my front porch.

Inside was a pair of workout pants:

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The customer said there was a hole in the seam at the knee and would I stitch it up?

Certainly!

Here is a photo of the small hole:

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Here’s what it looked like on the inside:

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So, I switched the thread to black and put in a stretch needle and sewed it up:

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When I have a small job like this, I like to see if there’s anything else that needs stitching up or reinforcing..

I noticed that the other knee seam was coming apart too:

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So, I stitched it up as well.

That way, the customer is happy you went the extra mile for them.

Did I charge this customer?

Actually, no.

This customer is my niece!

Personally, I don’t charge my family members.

And there are others I don’t charge.

Sometimes, I just want to bless them.

I may not want to charge a person for a small item if they are a first time customer.

They always come back with more alterations the next time.

So, when do you charge a minimum fee?

The bottom line is, you have to figure this one out for yourself.

You have to do what seems right and best for you.

I ask myself…”Do I feel comfortable charging for this?”

If the answer is “yes”, then I charge.

If it is “no”, then I don’t.

Now you’re wondering what amount to charge, right?

Ask yourself these questions…

What would you want to be charged for such an alteration?”

“What is your time worth?”

“How much work was it to get the job done?”

Answering these questions, and any others that pop into your head, should give you a pretty good idea on whether or not to charge a minimum fee.

How To Alter a Top That’s Too Low Cut

Have you ever tried to alter a blouse that was lower at the neck than you were comfortable with?

To make this alteration, we are going to do two things: take up the front shoulder seam and take in the collar.

Generally, you don’t need to take up the back of the blouse, but have the customer try it on so you can see how the back fits.

If the back fits well, don’t touch it.

If it doesn’t, you could pull up the back and front at the same time.

This back of this blouse fit great, so it didn’t need to be altered.

The only seam on this collar was at the back:

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and I was glad because I didn’t want to mess with the “fluff” on the front.

The center back neck seam was stitched and then gathered to fit:

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Let me explain what we’re going to do and then we’ll get after it.

We are going to decrease the circumference of the neck at the middle back seam and when we do that, we’ll need to decrease the circumference of the top as well.

To begin, take a seam ripper and unstitch the stitches that hold the collar and the shoulder seam together:

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Take out the stitches from just past one shoulder seam, all around the back of the neck to just past the other shoulder seam like this:

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Next, you’ll want to open up the shoulder seam. This was a delicate knit and I had to be careful where I placed my seam ripper so as not to cut the knit, but just cut the stitch:

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I opened up the shoulder seam halfway:

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Once that was opened up, I was able to shorten the front of the blouse by pinning like this:

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Stitch that shoulder seam by sewing along the original back shoulder seamline and trim off the excess front fabric.

Next, you’ll need to take in the back neck seam on the collar. Can you see the excess collar material?

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Since I took one inch off of the front of the blouse on the left and the right for a total of 2″, I need to take up 2 total inches on the collar as well.

I took the seam apart and stitched up two inches of fabric and trimmed the seam.

I apologize that the photo is not real clear, but I hope you get the idea:

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Now, stitch the collar to the neck edge of the blouse:

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You can see the newly adjusted collar:

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You might want to re-serge or zigzag any uneven edges.

That’s all there is to it!

If you have a t-shirt type top, you may need to work with ribbing or a facing.

Use the same principle of taking up the shoulders and taking in the circumference of the top to the measurements you need.

This will work for tank tops too.

Unless you have a really long top, you may not be able to adjust more than a couple of inches before it affects the look of the blouse.

But this should help those tops that are just a little too low for your comfort level.

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